Apocrypha

Apocrypha

Apocrypha, 2017, Site-specific live performance featuring Nathan Cha

 Caryatids erected on top of the Crypt Gallery, London

Caryatids erected on top of the Crypt Gallery, London

The word ‘crypt’ derives from the Greek word crypto, meaning hidden or obscure. Apocrypha, which stems from the same Greek root, challenged the theme of the exhibition 'One That Holds Everything' by asking, ‘can one really hold everything’? Apocrypha suggests that there are always things which deviate from the norm that are kept marginalised and obscure. The performance shone a spotlight on the unrepresented, the hidden, the queer, making them visible to the eyes of the public.

At that stage there was no deny that my work is influenced by Ancient Greek Theatre: from using the Caryatid's chyton as the basis of the costume design, to referencing the masks worn during Ancient Greek Tragedies and Comedies by painting a white mask on the faces of the performers. The Crypt Gallery also provided the ideal backdrop for a dramatic spectacle to unfold in the eyes of the audience. Thus the chyton wearing performers became ghosts trapped within the walls of the Crypt.

This was another collaborative effort, involving the help of Austrian - born artist Nathan Cha, whom I had met whilst undertaking Jay Pather's Art & Performance course in Venice. Nathan and I share a passion for dance and body movement - which we explored together via collaborating in Venice. Our collaboration sparked the idea of moving slow whilst ignoring the audience - which formed the basis of Apocrypha.